Sarajevo City Guide travel tourist sightseeing attractions information

Sarajevo City Guide Business Tourist Travel Information

attractions Sarajevo sightseeing Sarajevo history Sarajevo crime Sarajevo weather

Related Pages   Coach services to from Sarajevo / Rail services to from Sarajevo

Local Pages   Sarajevo Airport and Public Transport /  Bosnia Country Profile

No EU Status / currency the convertible mark

Sarajevo History Overview

In the Sarajevo suburb of Llidza in 1893 archaeologists unearthed relics from a Stone Age settlement. Between then and the 1st century several tribes ( attracted by the presence of the regions mineral wealth’s such as flint ) lived in the area – the most prominent of these were the Illyrian’s. During the following centuries the area was part of the Roman Empire. Detail of Sarjevo’s modern origins are scarce. There is a school of thought that the Romans built a town called Aquae Sulphurae on what was Llidza. Another theory is that towards the end of the first millennium a town called Vrhbosna was developed there possibly independent Aquae Sulphurae.

Modern Sarajevo was founded by the Ottoman Empire in the 15th century possibly 1461.‘Sara’ was the name of the city’s governor. The city flourished and during the next two centuries dwarfed Belgrade and Zagreb in importance. In 1699 the city was plundered and burnt to the ground by the Prince of Savoy, and in the 17th century its importance waned. In the 18th century it formed part of the Bosnian Rebellion against the Ottoman Empire before falling to the Austrian Hungarian Empire in 1878. From then until the outbreak of WW1 the city’s industries expanded and the city was modernised.

In 1918 it became part of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. During WW2 it was invaded by the Nazis and in 1944 by the Soviet Red Army who installed a Communist government which ruled until 1991. In March 1992, after the disintegration of the former Yugoslavia, Bosnia (and Herzegovina) declared itself and Independent Sovereign State. Serbian dominated Yugoslav forces then laid a three year unsuccessful siege of Sarajevo. In 1995 after International Military Intervention and the Dayton Peace agreement, the independence of Bosnia’s with Sarajevo as its capital was confirmed.

Sarajevo Sightseeing & Attractions

Sarajevo has seen masses of destruction throughout its troubled and turbulent history.  The city dates back to the middle ages and it has an estimated population of 311,000 people.  Sarajevo is well known for its cultural and ethnic diversity with  Muslims, Jews and Christians living  together  for centuries, but not without political or religious conflict.  It is nicknamed the ”Jerusalem of Europe” and was until the 20th century the only European city to have a Mosque.

The siege of Sarajevo between 1992 and 1995 devastated much of the city’s cultural and historical buildings and despite some efforts to renovate, the affects of this war can still be seen in present day Sarajevo. There is a huge Turkish influence here mainly due to the Ottoman rule which used to run Bosnia. This can be seen with the traditional Turkish baths and the Mosque’s designed and built in an Ottoman style. The Sarajevo zoo maybe small but with its adventure playground and cute animals it is one of the few child friendly activities here in Sarajevo.

The Morica Han, Saraci 73 Bascarsija  Sarajevo – The Han was built in 1551  as a Inn for travellers. It was thought that were about 40 of these kinds of Inn’s a century ago but this is the only one that remains intact. It has its own riding stables, store rooms that are centred around a cobbled courtyard. They now have wicker chairs for coffee drinkers and  a carpet shop with beautiful rugs now occupies the old stables.  The Inn is being refurbished as are the accompanying Lodging rooms. It’s latest resurrection occurred in the 1970’s. Upstairs is a restaurant which serves local cuisine and visitors who wish to look around are very welcome.website n/a

Svrzo House, Sarajevo Glodina 8 tel no: 387-33-53-52-64 [- This House used to be the residence of a Bosnian nobleman. It is constructed entirely out of wood and remains in immaculate condition to this day. The front part of the house is known as the public male area because this was the place where guests were welcome and business transactions were completed. Behind this with its own courtyard is the very private  female and family house. In both ares the rooms are beautifully decorated with ArabIian carpets, lavish clothes, scarves and mirrors and clocks which were regarded as symbols of wealth. It is possible to book a tour of the house  which can be found by going up the steps at Na Varosi Alley. Open 10am – 4pm during the week & open till 5am on weekends.  website n/a

Careva Mosque [Emperors Mosque] Sarajevo – The Careva Mosque was built in 1566 and its impressive clock tower was built 100 years after that, and furnished with a London clock.it is the oldest Mosque in Bosnia but You are only allowed to view the Tower, and are forbidden from going inside it. This is one of Sarajevo’s most important cultural landmarks. It is the largest single dome Mosque in Bosnia. This Islamic mosque was damaged in World War II but even more severely in the wars of the 1990’s and renovation work is still in progress. The clock Tower was built during the Ottoman period. The Mosque is Open daily for all visitors except during Prayer times. website  http://www.emperorsmosque.org/eng/

Bascarsija Sarajevo Stari Grad – This is an Old Bazaar which is regarded as the  cultural and historical centre of Sarajevo. Many consider it to be  Sarajevo’s most popular attraction.  Bascarsija was built sometime in the 15th century when Isa-Beg Isakovic founded the town of Sarajevo. The word originates from the Turkish word Bas which literally means head in English. Bascarja was double the size of what it is now because a Large fire struck it in the 19th century and devastated the Market.  It is made up of a central square and is surrounded by dozens of streets named after the trade or craft which is practiced in them  website http://bascarsija.info/
Gazi Husrev Beg-Hammam, Sarajevo Bascarsija  Turkish Baths – This is the city’s most impressive Turkish baths, built back in 1539.  Before you get any funny ideas they are strictly segregated in to male and female areas. At Certain times you may be entitled to a free tour of their historic premises, but these will need to be booked several days in advance. The Baths are named after the famous Bosniak Bey who ruled during the Ottoman’s Empire.  Sarajevo has 7 public baths altogether but this is by far the grandest of them all. No info on opening hours.website n/a
Sarajevo Zoo, Sarajevo  near Jezero Station – Unfortunately this Zoo was badly damaged in the war and is not seen as essential destination for tourists. The zoo opened to the public in 1951 did posses 150 animal species but was devastated by the affects of the siege of Sarajevo between 1992 and 1995. There are only a few animals to look at but it is an idyllic setting for children with its big playground, with swings and slides for young children. They currently have a fascinating exhibition on Dinosaurs. The zoo appears to lack many of the most popular animals including Big Cats, elephants and giraffes. Entry price is good value at around 1.5 km a person. Opening hours are 10 am till 5 pm in winter and 9 am till 9 pm in the summer months.website n/a
Ferhadija Mosque Banja Luka  Sarajevo – Ferhat is an Islamic mosque built by Bosnian Governor Ferhad-Beg Vukovic  who is a descendant of the iconic medieval family the Vukovic-Desisalic’s. It was built and consecrated in the 16th century and is one of the finest examples of Islamic and Ottoman architecture. With its small domes and exquisite built-on Minaret’s it embodies all that is beautiful about Ottoman style architecture.  There is 1 dome and 1 minaret on display here. Like so many other significant landmarks, this Mosque was severely damaged during the  Bosnian War of the 1990’s.website n/a
Tunnel Museum Sarajevo Tuneli 1 llidza tel no:033-628-591  – This Tunnel is known as the one that saved Sarajevo. This fascinating museum on the south-western side of the airport gives inquisitive visitors just a glimpse at the dreams and destruction that have occurred here. The sheer horror of the fierce artillery and sniper fire whilst terrified civilians waited and prayed for their survival. Admission price is KM5 and the opening times are  9 am till 4 pm Oct-Apr and 9 am till 7 pm May-Sep.website n/a

Tthe Clock Tower built 100 years later and furnished with a London clock. You can only view the tower.

Note Sarajevo is surrounded by mountains that form part of the Dinaric Alps – a range of mountains frequented by skiers and walkers. Most of the city is flat but some eastern parts of the city are similar to Dubrovnik as they are hilly and have some very steep gradients.

Eating Out In Sarajevo Cafes & Restaurants

Eating out in Sarajevo can take a little research as the Bosnians have a capacity for making a simple cafe as lavish looking as a well decorated restaurant.

The best cafes are to be found in The Old Town ( Bascarsija ) but most of them only sell Turkish Coffee which is very strong. Few serve cappuccino or nescafe. The menus are snacks rather meals. Some cafes are more like bars – The Central Cafe in The Old Town is worth a mention as it sells an agreeable Sarajevsko beer for € 0 .75 American style fast food outlets can be found all over Sarajevo.

Restaurants in Sarajevo

Restaurants in Sarajevo are plentiful and compared with cities like Dubrovnik they are not expensive. Inat Kuca (Veliki Alifakovac 1) is an example of this serving a range of Central European dishes and a special Bosnian Hot pot of a lamb and vegetables. Cevabdzinica Hodzic in the Turkish Quarter is an extremely clean looking Mediterranean restaurant selling fresh kebabs and a good vegetarian salad. Restaurant Una Prote Lockovica 618 in The Old Town, is expensive in local terms but has a good selection of traditional Bosnian dishes – the cheese and spinach has been noted more than once!

The Basenji Restoran on the northbank of the river and 200m from The National Library has a good range of local dishes, accompanied by excellent salads and offers a few Italian dishes as well. Patrons might need to check prices on bill compared with menu. For some people one of the jewels in Sarajevo’s crown is the Ragusa adjacent to the Eternal Flame. The main courses are delicious and especially recommended is the lasagna and white sauce. The crepes deserts which consist of thick cream and rich chocolate sauces apparently are amongst the best in Europe. You have been warned. 8pm Saturday then ?

Sarajevo Night Life – Nightclubs Music Dance
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Crime and Personal Safety and Security In Sarajevo Pick pockets operate in tourist areas especially on public transport other than this the crime level is low. However, In the last year there have been an increasing number of reports of thefts on sleeper trains to and from Sarajevo.

Sarajevo Tourist Board Information http://www.sarajevo-tourism.com/eng/default.wbsp

Sarajevo Travel Tips

Visas: Visas are required for entry into Sarajevo & Bosnia Herzegovina for visitors carrying UK, EU & US passports. Visas are required for all other countries. Clothing: Outside Sarajevo in particular, women are advised to address modestly as cultural attitudes are conservative. Credit Cards & Traveller Cheques: These are accepted in Sarajevo but not universally. Outside the city they are rarely accepted. Health: Visitors should consult their doctor about the current risk of rabies, hepatitis, tick-borne encephalitis, and typhoid fever. See also the Bosnia Country Profile

Sarajevo Tourist Board Leads The Way

Sarajevo has seen some dark days and It the following words on their web site are a refreshing read in these troubled times: For over four hundred years, mosques, synagogues, Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches have been built and have stood side by side here”.

Citizens of different nationalities and religious orientations live and work together, developing their city and their own style of togetherness regardless of conquerors and foreign rulers whose identity changed over and over again, fast or slowly, depending on the historical and geopolitical situations and the great-power interests.

http://www.sarajevo-tourism.com/eng/uniquespiritspace.wbsp

Sarajevo Bosnia Weather Details:
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Sarajevo Bosnia Weather Forecast
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monthly average and extreme temperatures in Sarajevo Bosnia:

sun hours per day

Temperatures
Average Daily
Records
Minimum
Maximum
Lowest
Highest
January
2
-4
3
-22
15
February
3
-3
5
-21
19
March
4
0
10
-15
25
April
5
5
15
-6
30
May
6
8
19
-2
31
June
8
12
23
5
33
July
9
13
26
6
37
August
9
13
27
4
38
September
7
10
23
2
34
October
4
6
16
-2
26
November
2
3
9
-12
21
December
2
-1
6
-16
17
extreme cold
hot
Hungary Village + editorial comment

 

 

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