Stockholm City Guide travel tourist sightseeing attractions information

Stockholm City Guide Business Tourist Travel Information

attractions Stockholm sightseeing Stockholm history Stockholm crime Stocholm weather

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Stockholm History Overview

Stockholm’s proven origins date back to 13th century when it was developed to protect Sweden from invasion. In 1397 it became part of the Kalmar Union together with Norway and Denmark. In 1523 Sweden became an independent state with Stockholm as the capital. During the next two hundred years the city expanded as the nation built up a major Swedish Empire.

In the early 18th century the empire folded and the city lived in peace. Many of its older buildings date back to this time as Stockholm and Sweden were not involved the world wars of the 20th century.

In the second half of the last century Stockholm expanded as it adapted to developments in technology and service based industries. The old historical quarter of Klara was replaced with aesthetic symbols of this change in the form of modern architecture. Now the Gamla Stan – the Old town is the main example of the city’s past. See also Sweden History

Stockholm Sightseeing & Attractions

Stockholm stands on 14 islands which are united by waterways spanned by bridges Some people (especially Swedes!) refer to it as the Venice of the North. As its old town escaped the devastation of war that many Europeans cities experienced in the 20th century it has numerous examples of architecture from medieval times to the 19th century architecture which are not spoilt by the thoughtless post war Stalin regeneration found in much of Europe.

The Swedish capital is full of entertaining and fascinating attractions for all the family. Sweden did not suffer much of the destruction that other European countries did in the 20th century so many of their most significant and fascinating landmarks and attractions remain intact. Swedes refer to Stockholm as the Venice of the North. There is much architectural splendour to be admired as well as amusement parks, Zoos for families with young children and enchanting Museums for inquisitive visitors.  There is the Adolf Fredrik Church for those who are interested in or adhere to religion.  You are likely to find whatever you’re looking for in the list I have drawn up below.Vasa Museum Stockholm Galavarvsvargen 14 115 – The Vasa Museum  has a 17th century Battleship of the same name that was salvaged in 1961, 333 years after it sunk. The Vasa sank during her Maiden voyage in 1628  and the honorary museum was opened to the public in 1990. According to the Vasa Museum’s official website, the Vasa is the most visited Museum in Scandinavia.  The Museum belongs to the Swedish national Maritime museums. Vasa has visitors of over 1 million per year, with a staggering 25 million people having frequented it already. The museum also has 4 other ships docked in the Harbour outside. The Ice Breaker launched in 1915, the Light vessel[1903], the Torpedo Boat[1966] and The Rescue boat [1944]. Opening hours are 10 am to 5 pm. Entry fee is  110 SEK for adults and  free for children under 18. website http://www.vasamuseet.se/Adolf Fredrik Church, Stockholm,Hollandargartan 16  – The Adolf Fredrik Church was named after the 18th century  Swedish King who commissioned it and is a  fascinating example of Baroque style architecture. The adjacent cemetery is the resting place of Johan Tobias Sergel and former Swedish Primeminister Olof Palme as well as many other famous names. The church was designed by Carl Fredrik Adelkrantz and  built between 1768 and 1774, replacing a wooden chapel  that had been there since 1674. website http://www.adolffredrik.se/lang/english.htm

Stockholm Architectural Museum, Skeppsholmen,  Stockholm – The Architectural museum  is one of Stockholm’s most captivating and informative museums.  It examines the concept of architecture from a  Swedish and International perspective. Interesting features are the wooden model of the city of Gothenburg and the museums archives which reportedly contain over 3/4 million architectural plans. They have the history of architecture from the 19th century up until the present day. Admission is free at certain times, check the website for further details. Opening hours are Tues 10 am till 8 pm and  Wed-Sun 10 am till 6 pm. They are closed on Friday’s. website http://www.arkitekturmuseet.se/english/

Biological Museum, Hazeliusporten Djurgarden  Stockholm  – The Biological Museum shows all the world in its natural splendour. They have huge collections of Scandinavian Birds  and Mammals in their natural environment. These collections include Backgrounds painted by Bruno Liljefors famous for his dramatic portrayals of wildlife. The museum was established in 1893 and designed by Swedish architect and illustrator Agi Lindegren. Opening times are October to March  Tuesday-Friday  12 pm till 3 pm and 10 am till 3 pm on weekends. April-Sept open daily from 11 am till 4 pm. Entry fee is usually about 30 SEK. website  http://www.biologiskamuseet.com/

The Royal Castle Stockholm The Old Town  Kungliga Slottet – The Royal Castle has been home to the Swedish monarchy for over 250 years.  There are parts of it which are open to tourists in the summer months. The castle is built out of brick  and the roof is covered with copper. There are an astonishing 1430 rooms inside making it one of the largest royal residences in the world. This majestic abode took over 60 years to complete, beginning construction in 1697 and being completed in 1760. Two of its main attractions are the Royal Chapel and  Haga Park. website http://www.kungahuset.se/royalcourt/royalpalaces/

Grona Lund Amusement Park, Lilla Allmana Grand 9   Djurgarden Stockholm – Grona Lund is a small and long running theme park located on Djurgarden Island.  This centrally located Theme Park  was first opened back in 1883 and has common features such as Rollercoaster’s, a Fun house and a Tunnel of Love. They have a total of 31 rides and 7 rollercoaster’s. This park is most suited to children under the age of ten. Lund is also well known for hosting live concerts with music legends such as Bob Marley playing here and drawing a record attendance of 32,000 people. Open 3 pm till 11 pm. Entry fee is 90 SEK and rises to 150 SEK after 6 pm. website http://www.gronalund.com/
Sankt Goran and the Dragon, Stockholm Kopmansbrinken Square – The iconic statue of St George and The Dragon was sculpted by Bert  Notkes in 1489. The statue depicts Saint George slaying the dragon. The Swedish connection came about when the King Of Sweden prayed to the heavens for help in defeating the Danes in battle and the King promised to build a statue of George if the Swedes were triumphant, which they obviously were. The detail on the copy of this original wooden sculpture  which can be found in Storkyran[The Big Church] is rather unusual. website n/a
Skansen Djurgardslatten 49-51 Stockholm – Skansen has an open air folk museum  and a zoo dedicated to the animals that can be found in Sweden. It was initially founded in 1891 by Artur Hazelius  who was attempting to demonstrate  the different ways of life in different parts of Sweden before the Country’s industrial era. The open air museum attracts an average of 1. 3 million visitors per year and  has lots of popular exhibits including a full replica of a 19th century Swedish village. Their zoo has an extensive range of Scandinavian animals which include The Brown bear, Red Fox and the ferocious Wolverine. In December they hold a Christmas market and in the summer there are Open air folk music concerts and dancing. Ticket prices are 70 SEK Jan-Apr  May and Sept 90 SEK and June to August 110 SEK,  Oct-Dec 65 SEK. Admission for a child is 40% cheaper than an adult ticket, Opening hours are  10 am till 3 and 4 pm in the winter and  10 am till 8 pm in the summer months. website  http://www.skansen.se/en
Kopmangatan, Stockholm Old Town Gamla Stan – Kopmangatan is  famous for being Stockholm’s oldest street. It was first documented in 1323. Situated in the Old Town, Kopmangatan translates as  The Merchants Street. The street served the Merchants of the city during the middle ages. It was the main link between Stortorget and the Fish Markey outside the Eastern Wall. website n/a

Old Town Gamla Stan Stockholm-  The Old Town which dates back to the 13th century is on a small island which is very enchanting. Most of its buildings are 300 – 400 years old in cobblestone streets which offer numerous attractions including museums restaurants. The most prominent attraction is The Royal Castle (see above) almost as popular but more difficult to navigate is the Marten Trotzigs Alley  probably one of the narrowest public walk  ways any where in the world.   In parts it is no wider than 90cm and the houses in it were once owned by one of Sweden’s richest merchants. It also has a vey challenging incline with steps and can get crowded!

Stockholm Visitors Guide  The official tourist guide for Stockholm is one of europe’s better tourist board sites available in several languages with updated information on current exhibitions.http://www.stockholmtown.com/Default.aspx?epslanguage=EN

Restaurants In Stockholm

Edsbacka Krog at Sollentunav. 220 is a little of the main beaten track but this coaching inn, complete with its wooden beams is a good source of extremely well prepared Scandinavian fare. The atmosphere is a little reserved and the service is extremely efficient and very formal. Telephone 08 -963300. Hermans, Fjällg. 23A, is one of Stockholm’s best vegetarian restaurants and very reasonably priced. The choice of food is broad including veggy lasagna, pasta and vegetable salads with some notable fruit pies and chocolate cakes to close with. The view of Stockholm Harbour is worth the shout as well. Telephone 08 – 6439480.

The Pelican, Blekingeg. 40, Stockholm, offers excellent authentic Swedish food (the herring and meatballs seemingly very popular on some tables) in a rather plain and time worn environment which appeals to those want to be bohemians. Telephone 08 – 55609090. Far more down to earth is Kalleren Mivitz Tyska Brinken 34 which is part bar and part restaurant. The latter is located in the cellars of the building which has to over three hundreds years old. The food is combination of traditional Swedish fare with some European additions. The game and salmon offerings are very agreeable. The informal atmosphere is another bonus. Telephone 08 – 209979.

Other restaurants with a more European menu include Bon Lloc Regeringsg. 111, which combines successfully Swedish dishes with those from the south of Europe. The quality of the food here has an exception reputation ( the fish dishes especially) and the restaurant is extremely popular with locals. Booking essential. Telephone 08 – 6606060.

Fredsgatan, Fredsgatan. 12, is another favourite for locals which apart from compliments Swedish fare with far east spices that are a little unorthodox but can can work wonders on chicken and other meats. The cocktails are equally adventurous. Telephone 08 – 248052.

Grill Ruby, Österlångg. 14, Stockholm, is a safe bet for the unadventurous and in the centre of the old town. Offering American style steak and various fish dishes against a background of country music it has a very informal almost party atmosphere about it. A little touristy, pricey but filling. Telephone 08 – 206015.

Opus, Blekingeg. 63, is a very petite french restaurant offering classical french cuisine and whether you have their perch pr pork fillet you are guaranteed a memorable feast. One of Stockholm best with advance booking essential. Telephone 08 – 6446080.

Crime & Personal Safety In Stockholm The crime rate is Sweden is low. Petty crime in Stockholm and other Swedish is cities is generally very low when compared with other European cities. However during the main tourist season between April and September pick pocketing can be a serious problem with cash and passports the main targets.

Stockholm Severe Weather Warning

Stockholm like all Scandinavian cities can experience very severe weather during the winter from October to March. Visitors to this country should be aware that appropriate winter clothing is necessary. Motorists should ensure that their cars etc are able to cope with adverse conditions and take emergency supplies of food and drink on long journeys. Visitors to remote areas should consider carrying an operational mobile phone.

Stockholm Sweden Weather Details:
Stockholm Sweden Weather Forecast
monthly average and extreme temperatures in Stockholm Sweden:

sun hours per day

Temperatures
Average Daily
Records
Minimum
Maximum
Lowest
Highest
January
1
-5
-1
-28
10
February
3
-5
-1
-25
12
March
5
-4
3
-22
15
April
7
1
8
-12
20
May
9
6
14
-3
28
June
11
11
19
1
32
July
10
14
22
8
35
August
8
13
20
5
31
September
6
9
15
0
26
October
3
5
9
-7
17
November
1
1
5
-11
12
December
1
-2
2
16
12
extreme cold
hot
Hungary Village + editorial comment

 

 

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